Jayla Jackson and Emani Stanton. (306908)

Black Girl Freedom Fund, which is “an initiative of Grantmakers for Girls of Color,” will be pouring millions of dollars into organizations with an aim to create a more hopeful future for Black girls, reports AfroTech. According to a press release, the #1Billion4BlackGirls campaign and Grantmakers for Girls of Color Black Girl Freedom Fund were launched to ensure a substantial amount of resources were allocated toward “the braintrust, innovation, health, safety, education, artistic visions, research and joy of Black girls, gender-expansive youth, and their families.”

Black Girl Freedom Fund’s mission continues as it announced $4 million in funding for its second round of grants. The financial support will be distributed to 68 organizations across the nation that have demonstrated leadership and established a community for Black girls, femmes and gender-expansive youth. Some of those areas of expertise include STEAM education, career opportunities, environmental justice and activism, financial and economic literacy, plus more.

“An investment in Black girls and their leadership is an investment in our collective freedom,” said Dr. Monique W. Morris, president and CEO of Grantmakers for Girls of Color, and co-founder of the #1Billion4BlackGirls campaig. “We know that every issue is a Black girl issue, and that Black girls are the voice and the heart of many social justice efforts, and we must invest the time and resources to cultivate their capacity to lead.”

The second round of organizations was chosen on the criteria of what leadership represents from a pool of six Black girls and gender-expansive youth ages 14 to 22 within the Black Girl Freedom Fund Grantmaking Council.

“Black girls, femmes and gender expansive youth are innovators, change agents and culture creators deserving of recognition, investment and joy now,” said Cidra M. Sebastien, manager of the Black Girl Freedom Fund. “Our grantee partners are amazing organizations that believe in the leadership and power of Black girls, femmes and gender-expansive youth, not solely for their potential futures but for who they are right now.”

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