Walkers take off at the 2019 Los Angeles Heart & Stroke Walk (courtesy of the American Heart Association)


The upcoming Los Angeles Heart & Stroke Walk will be a big celebration for the Moore family — a celebration of survivorship for their “favorite superhero,” Andre.
More than two years ago, Andre had coronary artery bypass surgery to treat blockages in six arteries in his heart. It wasn’t his first brush with heart disease. Andre suffered a heart attack 20 years earlier. Following surgery in 2020, the Moore family rallied together to help with Andre’s recovery and health transformation.
“My superhero came through like a champ,” said Andre’s daughter, Andrea. “As soon as he was cleared to exercise, I started showing up at my parents’ front door at 6 a.m. for a morning walk. For weeks, it was a struggle just to walk a block or two from the house and back. Within a few months, we were at one mile and slowly progressing. By six months, we were walking more than three miles, five times per week. By 10 months, we were hiking five miles, five times per week. While there are days when fatigue sets in, my dad has committed to a changed lifestyle to stay on track for better heart health. And even as things get busy, there’s nothing I look forward to more than these walks and the memories we make.”
Andrea is participating in the Los Angeles Heart & Stroke Walk with her dad, along with friends and family, to bring attention to heart disease and raise funds in support of the American Heart Association’s mission to save lives from cardiovascular disease.
The Heart & Stroke Walk, which takes place on Saturday, Oct. 22, at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, is expected to draw thousands of people. The event, sponsored by UCLA Health, Keck Medicine of USC and Dignity Health, includes a one mile walk around the concourse, health screenings, kids zone, live music, a gathering place for heart disease and stroke survivors and more. People can register to join at HeartWalkLA.org.
Heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases claim the lives of more than 870,000 men, women and children every year. Funds raised at the Heart Walk support efforts to improve care and outcomes for heart disease and stroke patients, advocate for stronger public health policies and fund innovative scientific research to improve survival and find cures.
The American Heart Association has invested more than $5 billion in research, resulting in breakthroughs that save and improve countless lives every day, including CPR, the artificial heart valve, cholesterol lowering drugs, stents and microsurgery. The Association is also committed to improving health equity by changing structures, laws and systems that make it difficult for many people to achieve a full and healthy life.
This past summer, an annual checkup revealed a small pinch in one of Andre’s bypassed arteries, which could have required additional surgery. While the problem eventually fixed itself, Andrea said the latest episode was a stark reminder of how delicate heart health is.
“It requires ongoing monitoring and much-needed research. Access to care is important but ongoing enhancement of assessment procedures and preventive care is critical. It is through these efforts that the American Heart Association is able to preserve precious moments for literally millions of heart patients. My family, like so many others, has experienced first-hand what it means to be given the opportunity to make more special moments every day. This is why supporting the American Heart Association is so important. I know I am personally grateful for all they have done and those who have made their work possible,” Andrea said.
For information about the Los Angeles Heart & Stroke Walk, go to HeartWalkLA.org.

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