Teri Williams, president/CEO of OneUnited Bank, is conducting a three-city book tour to promote her children’s financial literacy book,

“I Got Bank! What My Granddad Taught Me About Money.” Williams promoted and signed her new book recently at the Jefferson-Vassie D. Wright –Memorial Branch Library in South Los Angeles.

OneUnited Bank is also promoting it’s annual “I Got Bank Youth Essay & Art Contest.” To participate in the contest, young people have to read any financial literacy book for children, then either write an essay or submit an art project on financial literacy. The top 10 winners will receive $1,000 deposited into a OneUnited Bank savings account. The deadline is June 29.

Both projects fall in line with OneUnited Bank’s goal of educating the African-American community about financial literacy.

OneUnited Bank is the nation’s largest African-American-owned bank. The bank has made a concerted effort to appeal to Black customers by supporting issues they care about. OneUnited Bank supported Colin Kaepernick during his battle with the NFL over his protest of police violence with the “Take a Knee” campaign. They have also created debit cards designed around African royalty. OneUnited Bank also created a debit card to honor the contributions immigrants have made to the American economy.

Now Williams is throwing her weight behind financial literacy, which she believes is a critical issue in the African-American community.

OneUnited Bank is also the leader of the Bank Black movement that encourages Black consumers to transfer their funds to African-American owned financial institutions. The #BankBlack Movement was started by rapper Killer Mike three years ago as a positive response to the killing of Black men at the hands of police. Killer Mike encouraged the Black community not to just protest in the streets, but also voice their anger by moving their money to Black-owned banks.