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Julianne Malveaux

Stories by Julianne

Can Hillary survive email controversy?

Counting the Cost

If you had asked me just a year ago if former Secretary of State and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton would be the Democratic nominee for president of the United States, I’d have replied “no question.” I expected a near-coronation on the Democratic side, and a little rough-and-tumble on the Republican side.

Mike Huckabee doesn’t understand what matters

Counting the Cost

The 17-person race for the Republican nomination for president closely resembles a clown show, starring Donald Trump. The unfortunate contrast to Trump has been the tepid rhetoric of Jeb Bush, and the usual antics of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie.

Counting the Cost

Should African Americans endorse Whites over Blacks?

Two prominent Black Maryland officials– Montgomery County Executive Issiah Leggett and Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III–have endorsed White Rep. Chris Van Hollen, over Black Congresswoman Donna F. Edwards in the race to replace retiring Maryland Sen. Barbara Mikulski.

For centuries, Black lives did not matter

It should be unnecessary for an activist movement to hinge on the principle of the equivalency of life. In the worlds of Democratic presidential candidates, there is a compelling need to point out that Black lives matter. The problem with stating the obvious is that White lives have always mattered, and institutional racism has structured a lesser value for Black lives.

Counting the Cost

Release non-violent drug offenders

Jerry Alan Bailey was sentenced to more than 30 years in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal narcotics laws. Shauna Barry-Scott was sentenced to 20 years for having cocaine in her possession and intending to distribute it. Jerome Wayne Johnson grew marijuana plants and was charged with intending to distribute marijuana. He was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison.

Counting the Cost

Release non-violent drug offenders

Jerry Alan Bailey was sentenced to more than 30 years in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal narcotics laws. Shauna Barry-Scott was sentenced to 20 years for having cocaine in her possession and intending to distribute it.

Tear down the walls of economic inequality

Counting the Cost

After a spirited debate, the South Carolina House and Senate voted overwhelmingly to remove the Confederate battle flag from Statehouse grounds at the urging of Gov. Nikki Haley, who quickly signed the measure into law.

Counting the Cost

Church burnings should ignite more protests

t’s possible that lightning may have caused one of the fires. Another may be the result of faulty electricity. Still, in the past couple of weeks, there were fires at churches in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Ohio and Tennessee. At least two have been ruled arson by local fire departments. Several are still being investigated. Is it a coincidence that churches are burning in the days since the massacre at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.?

Focus on real Black women, not imposters

Counting the Cost

By the time you read this, perhaps the disturbing story of Rachel Dolezal, the prevaricating White woman who passed for Black, led the Spokane NAACP, and wove a web of elaborate lies, would have receded from media headlines. Probably not. I expect additional disclosures, a book, and a reality show. While most African Americans have concluded that Dolezal is a mentally impaired liar, too many Caucasians, obsessed with race, are likely to give this story legs.

Counting the Cost

Good and bad news in latest job numbers

The unemployment rate rose just a bit in May, an indicator that Wall Street and Main Street are celebrating because that means more people are looking for work and that more people are optimistic.

Counting the Cost

Justice is not blind

When racist attitudes, either conscious or subconscious, are combined with the discretionary powers that law enforcement officers have, the result is a differential outcome, with African Americans more likely to be the targets of “blind justice.”

Counting the Cost

Ignoring infrastructure needs is ‘stupid’

When Amtrak Northeast Regional Train 188 derailed on May 12, federal budget observers wondered if the underfunding of our nation’s fraying infrastructure was at least partly responsible for the deaths of eight people (according to the New York Times) and the injury of 200 more. Despite these questions, House Republicans voted to reduce President Barack Obama’s request for Amtrak funding from $2.45 billion to $1.14 billion. The Republican proposal not only reduces the current level of funding for Amtrak (which is $1.4 billion), it also delays or eliminates needed capitol for improvements.

Counting the Cost

Human rights for prisoners

Baltimorean Freddie Gray is neither the first, nor will he be the last person to die in police custody. According to a 2011 report from the Department of Justice, 4,813 people died in police custody between 2003 and 2009 (the most recent data, reported in 2011). However, not every state reports their data, so the number is probably higher. A new report is scheduled to be released this year or next.

For-profit colleges: Buyer beware

According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, about 1.7 million people will receive their Bachelor’s degrees, and another nearly 750,000 will receive associate’s degrees this May and June. The numbers have been rising over the past 10 years, with 22 percent more receiving bachelor’s degrees (the growth in women’s degrees is faster than that of men), and 12 percent more associate’s degrees (again, with the degrees awarded to women growing faster than those awarded to men).

Deferred and unheard

What happens to a dream deferred?

A young sister ‘hashtagged’ me out of my silo

Counting the Cost

When a colleague dropped the line, “You can’t hashtag your way to freedom,” I loved it! I laughed out loud, and promised that I’d not borrow the line, but steal it because I was so enamored of it. I’ve used it quite a few times since then, and gotten my share of grins and guffaws. So I used it again and again, always getting the same reaction.

Should African Americans endorse Whites over Blacks?

Counting the Cost

Two prominent Black Maryland officials– Montgomery County Executive Issiah Leggett and Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III–have endorsed Rep. Chris Van Hollen, a White man, over Black Rep. Donna F. Edwards in the race to replace retiring Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski.

Economic Recovery? Ask the Fed

Counting the Cost

Has the Great Recession ended with our economy returning to normal? That may be “conventional wisdom,” or the word we get from those who think that there is no more intervention needed to stimulate the economy. President Barack Obama has bragging rights on the reduction of unemployment rates and the fact that economic growth is robust. Citing these improvements, our Republican Congress wants to continue to tighten the federal budget belt. Despite this, the Federal Reserve Bank’s Open Market Committee says that there is too much slack in the labor market, and that unemployment rates could be lower than they are now.

After the chants

Counting the Cost

Just a week or so after Black History Month concluded, the Civil Rights Movement experienced a special commemoration. Tens of thousands thronged to Selma, Ala. for a historic march across the Edmond Pettus Bridge, marking March 7, 1965, the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” when armed police officers attacked peaceful marchers attempting to walk to Montgomery, the state capital. More than 10,000 people were attacked in 1965, including Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), whose powerful eloquence puts the entire protest movement in context.

How about letting members of Congress live like other people?

Counting the Cost

Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Calif.) couldn’t bring his French bulldog, Lily, on an Amtrak train. So when Amtrak funding came up for a vote, he inserted a provision that required one car on an Amtrak train to be designated a “pet car.” Pet owners will pay a fee to bring their furry companions on the train, and there are size restrictions to the pets that can travel. Still, this new provision is seen as a victory for pet owners who ride trains.

Democrats still searching for winning formula

Counting the Cost

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel just got spanked. Despite a campaign war chest of more than $15 million and the support of President Barack Obama, the former Congressman and White House chief of staff could not avoid a run-off in the non-partisan mayoral election.

At 100, Olivia Hooker is a living history lesson

Counting the Cost

Olivia Juliet Hooker celebrated her 100th birthday on February 12. In 1944, she was among the first five African American women allowed to serve in the Coast Guard as a SPAR (the acronym derived from the translations of the Coast Guard’s motto, “Semper Paratus, Always Ready”). SPARS was the nickname of the United States Coast Guard’s Women Reserve.

Poverty doesn’t have to be a state of mind

Counting the Cost

The racial differential in the poverty rate is staggering. Last time I checked, about 12 percent of people in the United States, one in eight people are poor. Depending on race and ethnicity, however, poverty is differently experienced. Fewer than one in 10 Whites are poor; more than one in four African Americans and Latinos are poor.

Counting the Cost

Making no progress on race with ‘Progressives’

I like Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). Her progressive ideas are just what we need while Hilary Clinton is straddling the fence, and still cozying up with bankers. Warren says she isn’t running for president, but there are quite a few political action committees urging her to run.

Counting the Cost

The real Barack Obama re-emerges

President Barack Obama knocked it out of the park during the State of the Union address. He was strong, progressive, firm, and relaxed. He was almost cocky as he offered a few jokes, smugly announced that he would have no more elections, and just generally exuded confidence. Instead of the kumbaya thing, he laid out his priorities to a Republican Congress that will likely block much of what he proposed, especially when it comes to raising taxes on the wealthy to support his free community college program.

World is indifferent to missing Nigerian girls

Counting the Cost

One could not help but be impressed by the millions that turned out in Paris to stand against the Islamist terrorists who killed workers at the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo and four others at a kosher grocery store. Two law enforcement officers were also killed, bringing the total to 17.

The education of Dr. King

Counting the Cost

As he labored for social, civil and economic justice, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was extremely concerned both about the educational inequities that were a function of segregation, and about the purpose and quality of education. As early as 1947, as a Morehouse College student, he wrote an article, “The Purpose of Education,” for the Maroon Tiger, the college newspaper. His article is as relevant today as it was then.

Counting the Cost

Breathing life into a movement

“I can’t breathe,” gasped Eric Garner, again and again and again. “I can’t breathe,” he said, as several police officers were on top of him, choking him, pushing his head onto the concrete sidewalk. The man was not resisting arrest; he simply had the temerity to ask a police officer not to touch him. And because he was allegedly selling loose cigarettes, the life was choked out of him.

Tease photo

Twitter sparks debate on White privilege #CrimingWhileWhite

Following the news that New York City officer Daniel Pantaleo, who held unarmed Eric Garner in an against-policy chokehold resulting in his death, would not be indicted, protests broke out around the country in what many called “another total miss” by a grand jury. But what resulted after the outcome of the trial was even more surprising. Scores of White Americans took to Twitter in what may be the largest admission of “White privilege” on record.

Counting the Cost

Marion Barry: The people’s mayor

Washington, D.C., just lost an icon. In the early morning hours of Nov. 23, D.C.’s “Mayor for Life” succumbed to some of the health challenges that have plagued him for several years. Even in ill health he was, as he had been all his life, an icon to the people, especially those in the poorest part of the city. He distributed turkeys to the poor every year. More importantly, he pushed legislation that would not punish felons when they applied for jobs.

The politics of leadership

Counting the Cost

Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander will likely become chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Though he has yet to be elected by his Republican peers, he has given several interviews that indicate how he would change the way educational services are delivered in our country. For all his bluster, though, his approach is essentially to privatize and push states rights.

Loretta Lynch deserves swift confirmation

Counting the Cost

African American women were excited about President Barack Obama’s nomination of Loretta Lynch to replace Eric Holder as Attorney General of the United States. Since she has sailed through two Senate confirmations, her current confirmation ought to move quickly and without controversy.

Democrats have no consistent message

Counting the Cost

Pundits are likely to spend the next several weeks attempting to explain the many reasons that Republicans simply kicked the Democrats square in the hind parts to dominate both houses of Congress in ways that had not been expected. With turnout at an abysmal low—33 percent—two thirds of the electorate didn’t think this election important enough to vote. President Obama had it right when he said he heard them.

Counting the Cost

Online colleges flunk common sense

The most common model of college attendance is that a young person who graduates from high school and heads directly to college, perhaps taking a year off in between to work, take a “13th class.” While many students start off right after high school, some of them have breaks in their higher education, dropping out to save money to continue, or to deal with family matters.

Counting the Cost

The ‘Christmas Creep’

Did you notice that some stores are already touting Christmas sales? They are encouraging people to start buying for Christmas now. We’ve been experiencing this “Christmas creep” for years. Some of us are reluctant to call it “Christmas” creep because there is no Christ or Christianity in the profligate spending that accompanies a season that should be defined by gratitude and reflection. The birth of Christ should symbolize rebirth, the symbolism of the seven principles of Kwanzaa, a signal to reflect on African American community building and spirituality.

Ebola knows no borders

Counting the Cost

When it comes to matters of trade and economics, experts are eager to speak of “globalization.” People are keen to talk about the dissolution of borders and the many ways that countries work together across the globe. At least part of every Apple computer purchased in the U.S. was manufactured or assembled in Ireland. Many call centers are located in the Carribean and India. American companies subcontract these jobs to other countries because hourly wages are lower in those countries than at home.

Countering voter suppression moves

Counting the Cost

The Supreme Court recently blocked an appeals court ruling that would have restored seven days of voting in Ohio. In just three sentences, the court reduced voting access for tens of thousands of Ohioans, in yet another effort to suppress the vote.

African Americans less ready to retire

Counting the Cost

When the Federal Reserve Board issued its Survey of Consumer Finance (SCF), its findings were not surprising. The report, which is issued every three years, reflected the improved economic conditions since 2010, when the Great Recession was at its peak. The unemployment rate, though unevenly distributed, has dropped, and income and wealth have increased for some groups, but dropped for those at the bottom. Median wealth of African Americans and Latinos (grouped together by SCF reporting) fell from $21,000 to $18,100 while White wealth grew from $139,900 to $142,000. Just under half of all African Americans own homes, compared to nearly 70 percent of Whites, and housing value represents the largest portion of net worth for middle income families. When some of these SCF findings are combined with what we know about pensions and retirement preparedness, the unfortunate conclusion is that African Americans are less ready to retire than Whites, but better prepared than Latinos.

The Boomerang Generation

Counting the Cost

One of the most interesting findings of the data recently released by the Census Bureau is that so many recent college graduates live with their parents. Described as “boomerang” graduates, a third of them occupy a basement, a spare room, their old room, a floor or couch. Blessedly, they have parents with whom to live. And if they are 26 or younger, they have health insurance, thanks to the Affordable Care Act.

America needs a raise

Counting the Cost

The Dow Jones Industrial Average has been floating at or above the 17,000 mark in the past two months–an all time high.

Tease photo

Back to school, back to basics

Counting the Cost

Between early August and late September, students are going back to school. Before they go to school, though, they and their parents will hit the malls and stationary stores to prepare for their return. Retailers say that students and their parents will spend $75 billion on back-to-school items, and clothing represents about a third of this spending.

Policing the police

Counting the Cost

Except for the Good Lord, everybody has someone or something to “check” him or her. Unfortunately, President Barack Obama has an unresponsive Congress to check him, and Supreme Court to do the same. Elected officials are checked by voters (when they vote), and the Securities and Exchange Commission usually checks corporate crooks

Dogs get more respect than Michael Brown

Counting the Cost

It doesn’t matter if you are a state legislator or an alderman, a journalist or a local leader. If you are in Ferguson, Mo., you won’t get any respect. You can be the uncle of a victim whose body was left to lie on the street for several hours and you will not be allowed to cover your young nephew. Not many would let a dog lay uncovered for several hours. Young Black Michael Brown apparently got less consideration than a dog.

Tease photo

Working at taking a vacation

Counting the Cost

I don’t do vacations well. I have to be pushed and prodded, just about guilt-tripped, into taking time off. Sure, I’ll take an hour here, an evening there, to read a book or play word games. But it just about takes an act of God to get me to go play.

Economic growth is up; will it trickle down?

counting the Cost

Last quarter’s rate of economic growth is good news, especially after the economy stalled, losing momentum in the first quarter of 2014. Many said it was an aberration caused by bad weather, especially since economic growth in the last half of 2013 was more than three percent.

Tease photo

Dogs eat better than 1 million children

Counting the Cost

The South African charity Feed A Child (http://www.feedachild.co.za/) chose to highlight child poverty in South Africa by portraying a little Black boy being fed like a dog by a seemingly affluent White woman. In the ad, the boy has his head on the woman’s lap, he’s kneeling at her feet, on his knees, and licking off her fingers. The point, they say? According to the ad’s tagline “The average dog eats better than millions of children.”

Independence? Advertising, support, and African American organizations

Counting the Cost

In the “afterglow” of the Fourth of You Lie, I am flipping through an African American magazine, enjoying the content, but looking for the “bite.” For how can you not bite, when you look at the space in which African American people occupy? Our middle class is growing, but fragile. The level of poverty among African Americans has hardly changed in the past decade. Unemployment rates for African Americans remain high, despite talk of economic “recovery.” But too many of our organizations have little bark, and even less bite.

Ikea does its part to fill the wage gap

Counting the Cost

President Barack Obama would like the national minimum wage to rise to $10.10 an hour. By executive order, he has already raised the minimum wage for federal contractors. House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) has threatened to sue President Obama for his use of executive order, which he says circumvents Congressional authority.

The face of economic recovery

Counting the Cost

At its June 18-19 meeting, the Federal Reserve is hedging its bets. It says the United States economy is on the mend, but more slowly than expected.

Did the UNCF make a deal with the devil?

Counting the Cost

When the Koch Foundation gave the United Negro College Fund $25 million, it set off a maelstrom of comments in cyberspace and real time. “How dare the UNCF take money from the Koch brothers?,” some asked. “They ought to send it back,” said others. One woman told me she would never give to UNCF again because of the Koch donation. Another said the Koch donation changes her perception of UNCF.

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