Quantcast

Julianne Malveaux



Recent Stories

Counting the Cost

Release non-violent drug offenders

Jerry Alan Bailey was sentenced to more than 30 years in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal narcotics laws. Shauna Barry-Scott was sentenced to 20 years for having cocaine in her possession and intending to distribute it. Jerome Wayne Johnson grew marijuana plants and was charged with intending to distribute marijuana. He was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison.

Counting the Cost

Release non-violent drug offenders

Jerry Alan Bailey was sentenced to more than 30 years in federal prison for conspiring to violate federal narcotics laws. Shauna Barry-Scott was sentenced to 20 years for having cocaine in her possession and intending to distribute it.

Tear down the walls of economic inequality

Counting the Cost

After a spirited debate, the South Carolina House and Senate voted overwhelmingly to remove the Confederate battle flag from Statehouse grounds at the urging of Gov. Nikki Haley, who quickly signed the measure into law.

Counting the Cost

Church burnings should ignite more protests

t’s possible that lightning may have caused one of the fires. Another may be the result of faulty electricity. Still, in the past couple of weeks, there were fires at churches in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Ohio and Tennessee. At least two have been ruled arson by local fire departments. Several are still being investigated. Is it a coincidence that churches are burning in the days since the massacre at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C.?

Focus on real Black women, not imposters

Counting the Cost

By the time you read this, perhaps the disturbing story of Rachel Dolezal, the prevaricating White woman who passed for Black, led the Spokane NAACP, and wove a web of elaborate lies, would have receded from media headlines. Probably not. I expect additional disclosures, a book, and a reality show. While most African Americans have concluded that Dolezal is a mentally impaired liar, too many Caucasians, obsessed with race, are likely to give this story legs.

Counting the Cost

Good and bad news in latest job numbers

The unemployment rate rose just a bit in May, an indicator that Wall Street and Main Street are celebrating because that means more people are looking for work and that more people are optimistic.

Counting the Cost

Justice is not blind

When racist attitudes, either conscious or subconscious, are combined with the discretionary powers that law enforcement officers have, the result is a differential outcome, with African Americans more likely to be the targets of “blind justice.”

Counting the Cost

Ignoring infrastructure needs is ‘stupid’

When Amtrak Northeast Regional Train 188 derailed on May 12, federal budget observers wondered if the underfunding of our nation’s fraying infrastructure was at least partly responsible for the deaths of eight people (according to the New York Times) and the injury of 200 more. Despite these questions, House Republicans voted to reduce President Barack Obama’s request for Amtrak funding from $2.45 billion to $1.14 billion. The Republican proposal not only reduces the current level of funding for Amtrak (which is $1.4 billion), it also delays or eliminates needed capitol for improvements.

Counting the Cost

Human rights for prisoners

Baltimorean Freddie Gray is neither the first, nor will he be the last person to die in police custody. According to a 2011 report from the Department of Justice, 4,813 people died in police custody between 2003 and 2009 (the most recent data, reported in 2011). However, not every state reports their data, so the number is probably higher. A new report is scheduled to be released this year or next.

For-profit colleges: Buyer beware

According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, about 1.7 million people will receive their Bachelor’s degrees, and another nearly 750,000 will receive associate’s degrees this May and June. The numbers have been rising over the past 10 years, with 22 percent more receiving bachelor’s degrees (the growth in women’s degrees is faster than that of men), and 12 percent more associate’s degrees (again, with the degrees awarded to women growing faster than those awarded to men).

More stories