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David L. Horne, PH.D.

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Practical Politics

The politics of real representation

Big ups for Rep. Karen Bass! She is the ranking member of the Africa sub-committee in Congress (proper name Sub-Committee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations). As such, she is the number-one congressional advocate for increasing ‘trade, not aid’ benefits from the USA to Africa. For the past few years, she remained the primary “go-to” person for the successful renewal of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), which was signed last week by President Barack Obama for a 10-year renewal. If you have to be in a legislative fight, Rep. Bass is the one you want in your corner. She gets it done and she does not give up. She is the model of real representation in today’s U.S. Congress.

The politics of historical delusion

Practical Politics

One news source reported this week that one of its investigators interviewed one of Dylann Roof's cousins, who said that Roof had been trying to romance a young White girl recently who rejected him in favor of hooking up with a local Black youth. That, buttressed by listening over and over to loud White-power music, drove Roof to the point of his dastardly deed in Emanuel A.M.E. Church, said the cousin. That rationale may or may not have substance.

Tease photo

Being a modern Black man in America

Conceptions of African American fathers

In the White House currently living and functioning brilliantly, is the most important role model of a Black husband and father, present and accountable—President Barack Obama. We can’t all be like him, but the precedent has clearly been set.

Practical Politics

The politics of helping African American young men

In February 2014, to add to the public policy executive order he’d already issued in July 2012 regarding assisting African American youth to overcome the systemic obstacles against their success in the USA, President Barack Obama issued an order to establish My Brother’s Keeper, a distinctive governmental approach toward supporting thousands, even millions of African American young men toward positive growth and success in this country.

Tease photo

Being a modern Black man in America

Conceptions of African American fathers

In the White House currently living and functioning brilliantly, is the most important role model of a Black husband and father, present and accountable—President Barack Obama. We can’t all be like him, but the precedent has clearly been set.

The politics of putrid puffery

Pratical Politics

One distinctive and unfortunate part of African American culture is the too-often repeated exercise of public rants against each other. This habit is not ameliorated because it has a very long-standing tradition within the community, nor is it okay just because both famous and not-so-famous Black folk engage in it.

The politics of sudden, silent death

Clearly, being Black means having a ton of obstacles relentlessly in one’s way forward. Some such hurdles are self-imposed (e.g., too much pork-eating, too much greasy fried food, too much self-hate, too much backward thinking when thinking at all, etc.). However, most hurdles we face are social-political realities in the U.S.A. (e.g., too frequent police perception of Blacks as criminals or troublemakers, too frequent disregard for Black folk in general, an avalanche of negative social stereotypes in medicine, education, economics, etc.). Letting ourselves go to float on these daily stormy waters is a distinct recipe for death and disaster. Some kind of way, though, most of us survive.

The politics of respecting the office

Practical Politics

In the more than 2,300 days he’s been president of the United States, the sun and wind powering Barack Obama’s tall, clipper ship have more than once been interfered with, as nuts and overly partisan ideologues have disrespected the office of the president in their vain attempts at besmirching the personal integrity and reputation of the man himself.

Reparations conference report: Part Two

The Caribbean Reparations Commission (CRC) presented and read its CARICOM National Reparations 10-Point Plan (formally called the Caribbean Restorative Justice Plan) at the New York conference as a foundation document. That plan calls for:

The politics of the new reparations movement

Practical Politics

The call went out, far and wide. It was answered by delegations from more than 21 countries, according to the conference organizers. That number included Martinique, Trinidad-Tobago, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Barbados, Jamaica, Guyana, Antigua, the Virgin Islands, Canada, Sweden, France and Cuba among others.

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