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Cynthia E. Griffin

Managing Editor

323-905-1300 Extension: 1308



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Minimum wage debate finds two sides to issue

With three different studies serving as the centerpiece of discussion, the Los Angeles City Council Economic Development Committee on Tuesday kicked off a series of public hearings regarding a proposal to raise the minimum wage in Los Angeles.

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Summer jobs available for youth

Thousands of spots teach about careers and more

Summertime is coming, and as the old song says “the livin’ is easy” and that is especially the case for young people who have an opportunity to snag one of the more than 20,000 jobs that will be offered to youth in Los Angeles County this year.

Campaign for minimum wage pushes forward

Blacks impacted more by low wages

If the Los Angeles City Council were to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour, it would create 64,000 new jobs, says Rusty Hicks, executive-secretary treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor and co-convener of the Raise the Wage Coalition.

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Local robotics teams gear up for season

AV teams begin competition this weekend

Robotics season is under way, and there are a number of local high schools busy building and preparing to enter their creations in a variety of regional competitions leading up to the international world champions at the Edward Jones Dome in St. Louis, April 22-25.

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Celebration of Black History strikes chord

Ninety years after the first recognition, interest grows

When Harvard-educated historian, author and journalist Carter G. Woodson and the organization he founded—the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH)—conceived of the idea of Negro History Week in 1925, the goal was simply to raise awareness of African American contributions to civilization in order to begin to eliminate prejudice. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. According to an article by Howard University Professor Daryl Michael Scott, the response, at the time, was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive Whites—not simply White scholars and philanthropists—stepped forward to endorse the effort.

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Celebration of Black History strikes chord

Ninety years since the first recognition, effort grows

When Harvard-educated historian, author and journalist Carter G. Woodson and the organization he founded—the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH)—conceived of the idea of Negro History Week in 1925, the goal was simply to raise awareness of African American contributions to civilization in order to begin to eliminate prejudice. The event was first celebrated during a week in February 1926 that encompassed the birthdays of both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. According to an article by Howard University Professor Daryl Michael Scott, the response, at the time, was overwhelming: Black history clubs sprang up; teachers demanded materials to instruct their pupils; and progressive Whites—not simply White scholars and philanthropists—stepped forward to endorse the effort.

Intimate connections

Three men discover how their lives intersect in the last days of the Civil War

Whether it was intentionally scheduled or not, putting “The Whipping Man” on stage this month is a good reminder of how interconnected the lives of Blacks and Whites in this country are.

Hamilton prepares for decathlon

Yankees one of LAUSD’s 11 teams bound for Sacramento

For most of the 59 teams that competed, the hours of studying in preparation for the 2015 Academic Decathlon in the Los Angeles Unified School District are done for the moment.

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AIDS/HIV awareness efforts continue

Local and national programs offered

With African Americans accounting for almost half (44 percent) of all people living wth HIV/AIDS in the United States and Black males ages 13-24 representing the highest percentages of new HIV infections (38 percent), National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, held Feb. 7, took on even more importance.

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Knight High awarded most improved

Wins despite being short three members

Despite having only six members when most of the squads had nine, William J. Pete Knight High School finished 43rd in the Academic Decathlon. But more importantly, the 2015 team collected 11,357 more points this year than in 2014 which enabled the youngsters to earn the most improved award in the competition held by the Los Angeles County of Education (LACOE).

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