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The face of economic recovery

At its June 18-19 meeting, the Federal Reserve is hedging its bets. It says the United States economy is on the mend, but more slowly than expected.

The politics of representing a constituency

One of the most cherished and distinctive ingredients of American democracy is the right of constituents to expect their elected representatives to have a residency among them. That has been part of a belief from the outset that in order ...

Did the UNCF make a deal with the devil?

When the Koch Foundation gave the United Negro College Fund $25 million, it set off a maelstrom of comments in cyberspace and real time. “How dare the UNCF take money from the Koch brothers?,” some asked. “They ought to send ...

Closed mouths don’t get fed—time to roar!

As the constitutional deadline for adopting California’s budget approached Sunday evening, California’s families in need, many of them families of color, should have been able to breathe a sigh of relief.

Celebrating positive Black Fathers

As we approach Fathers’ Day, it is important to lift up those Black American fathers who are doing what is right and good for their children, families, and communities. Too often when the issue of Black men is raised, it ...

A pledge to keep to our youth

As young people graduate from high school, or finish the school year as sophomores and juniors, they begin to search for summer jobs. For the past several summers, the jobs have not been there, and this summer will be no ...

‘Belle:’ What a Movie!

These days, the old saying about “art imitating life” is more commonly applicable to motion pictures rather than old form stage plays. I have had the opportunity to see a lot of movies and consider myself a pretty good judge ...

The Politics of State Mitosis

Since California became a state in 1849, there have been attempts to divide its territory into smaller areas: In those days, the major issue was to have a non-slave state North California, and a slave state South California. That battle ...

Remembering Maya Angelou

Many people will remember Maya Angelou for her phenomenal career. She was a true renaissance woman–an author, teacher, dancer, performer, radio personality and a producer. I will remember her as a sister friend, and a wise “auntie” who didn’t mind ...

Child Watch

“Foster care is not fun for anyone,” says 24-year-old law student Amy Peters, who entered Nebraska’s foster care system at age 12 and remained until she “aged out” at 19.

Dishonoring our vets

The last Monday in May, Memorial Day, was designed to honor those who died in service to our country. It is tragically ironic that around the same time we are honoring and remembering the dead, we are learning about deficiencies ...

The Promise of Colombia

Where do I begin to tell the story of our trade mission to the beautiful nation of Colombia? It had been in the planning stage for more than 14 years. It began when Oscar Gamboa, who works for the government, ...

Indenturing our young people

The young in America are being forced into cruel levels of debt, and this debt is already curbing their life prospects. Its economic effects are damaging to everyone. Yet with Washington frozen, the debt burdens on the young are likely ...

The 60-year journey from segregation

Because I was a horribly ill-behaved child, I found myself shipped from San Francisco to Moss Point, Miss. in August 1969. My mother’s plan was that I’d spend my junior year in high school there and live with my schoolteacher ...

Sixty years after Brown v. Board of Education

Editor’s note: Beverly Daniel Tatum is the president of Spelman College in Atlanta and the author of “Can We Talk About Race?” and “Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation.” The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those ...