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Church donates $2 mil to African American Museum

Utah

Carol Ozemhoya | OW Contributor | 2/28/2019, 4:54 p.m.
With thousands packed into the Salt Palace Convention Center...
Martin Luther King

With thousands packed into the Salt Palace Convention Center, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints kicked off the ninth annual RootsTech family history and technology conference by announcing a $2 million donation to the forthcoming International African American Museum Center for Family History in Salt Lake City, reports the Desert News.

Elder David A. Bednar of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles presented the church’s donation to Michael B. Moore, president and CEO of the museum. “We have such high hopes and aspirations for the work that we will do for lives we will touch,” Moore said. “To be able to partner with the church and with FamilySearch in this very important work, it’s just an amazing opportunity and it will fortify our capabilities and extend the reach of our ability to touch people. It’s an amazing gift. We are so grateful.”

Elder Bednar said the church is pleased to be part of an effort that will help connect “Heavenly Father’s children to a heavenly family,” regardless of skin color, cultural background or language. “We want to support the museum and the Center for Family History because we both value the strength that comes from learning about our families,” Elder Bednar said. “The museum will not only educate its patrons on the important contributions of Africans who came through Gadsden’s Wharf and Charleston, it also will help all who visit to discover and connect with ancestors whose stories previously may not have been known.”

Elder Bednar continued: “I’ve had the opportunity to oversee the work of the church in Africa for many years and it changes you. There is a spiritual quality to the African saints that gets into your mind, it gets into your heart. So to see something like this occurred today that can benefit so many in various parts of the world that have come from Africa and the people in Africa. That’s a that's a highlight in my life.”

Martin Luther King III, son of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., was on hand for the announcement. His connection to the church goes back more than a decade to when the church offered humanitarian relief in Louisiana. King said he was “beyond impressed.” A few years later he came to Utah and learned about the church’s family history program. Again, he was impressed. “When you talk about the church and genealogy, you’re really talking about connections. When people understand how they’re connected, ultimately, perhaps we all are connected. That’s one of the major things that the church does. That is so impressive and amazing,” King said. “So of course, this museum will be located in Charleston, South Carolina. It is a gift to this nation and the world because people will be coming from all over the world to visit this museum. There's a lot of history to be learned and appreciate and a lot of bridges that will be built.”Church donates $2 mil to African American Museum

With thousands packed into the Salt Palace Convention Center, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints kicked off the ninth annual RootsTech family history and technology conference by announcing a $2 million donation to the forthcoming International African American Museum Center for Family History in Salt Lake City, reports the Desert News.