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Black millenials closing the digital divide

OW Staff Writer | 11/10/2016, midnight
Black millennials are reportedly 11.5 million strong and leading a viral vanguard that is driving African Americans’ innovative use of ...

— 91 percent of African Americans say they access the Internet on a mobile device, an increase from 86 percent in 2015, which further cements their status as digital leaders.

— 55 percent of Black Millennials report spending at least one hour a day on social networking sites, which is 6 percent higher than all Millennials, while 29 percent say they spend at least three hours a day, 9 percent higher than all Millennials.

— 28 percent of African Americans age 35+ say they use social networking sites for at least one hour per day, which is 2 percent higher than the total population in this age group. Ten percent of African Americans age 35+ say they use social networking sites for at least three hours per day, which is 2 percent higher than the total population age 35+).

— African American millennials watch nearly 33 hours of live and DVR time-shifted television per week, about 12 and half more hours per week than total Millennials.

— African American millennials spend about two hours more per week (eight hours and 29 minutes versus six hours and 28 minutes) using the internet on PCs, and about an hour more weekly (three hours and 47 minutes versus two hours and 33 minutes) watching video on PCs than total Millennials.

Education advancements of Black Millennials

— 89 percent of African Americans ages 25–34 completed high school, compared to 77 percent of Black Americans ages 55 and older.

— 21 percent of African Americans ages 25–34 have an associate’s college degree or higher, versus 17 percent of those who are 55 and older.

— African American incomes and spending power

— Overall Black spending power is projected to reach $1.4 trillion by 2020.

— From 2004 – 2014 the number of Black households with annual incomes of $50,000 - $75,000 increased 18 percent compared to 2 percent for the total U.S. For Black households earning $100,000+ annually, the increase between 2004 and 2014 was 95 percent, compared with 66 percent for the total population.

— The share of Black households with an income less than $25,000 declined from 43 percent in 2004 to 37 percent of the total African American population in 2014.

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