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A smokin’ summer

Ancho chile rub is the star

Family Features | 8/19/2016, midnight
If the surge in barbecue and smoking competitions across the country is any indication, grilling has become an art form. ...

If the surge in barbecue and smoking competitions across the country is any indication, grilling has become an art form. This summer, gather around the grill or try a new technique that’s rising in popularity—smoking—to create a masterpiece meal and plenty of memories.

From secret marinades to tricked out grills and smokers, competitive smokers know there is a near ritualistic approach to teasing the perfect flavor out of a premium cut of meat. Follow in the footsteps of those pit masters and smoke like a pro with these tips from Omaha Steaks Executive Chef Karl Marsh.

Start with style

The first step is deciding how you’d like to prepare your meat. Consider stepping up your game by smoking your meat. Smoking is a popular choice because it infuses flavor throughout the meat, while extended cook times at low temperatures make it extra tender. Another advantage is the chance to create a wide range of unique flavors using wet and dry rubs, as well as seasoned wood chips and planks.

Choose your cut

Virtually any meat can be smoked, but the most popular cuts of meat to smoke are brisket, ribs, pork shoulder or turkey, all of which are typically large in size. Guarantee a great experience with Omaha Steaks brisket for smoking or whole pork butt, which were created with the competitive barbecue and smoking circuit in mind.

Ready your rub

Rubs are often used to add flavors and surface texture to a cut of meat. For best results, brush meat with cooking oil or another liquid ingredient (such as yellow mustard) before adding the rub. Spread the rub on a clean plate and place the meat on it. Coat both sides with the rub by gently pressing the meat on the plate.

Set up the smoker

Some pit masters consider their equipment as vital an ingredient as the meat or flavorings they choose. Preparation varies from one recipe to the next, but one constant is the importance of maintaining a steady temperature. As you prepare your charcoal, be conscious of where you’ll place any wood chips or other flavor enhancers for maximum impact.

Slow and steady

Sensational flavor takes time to build, so plan to dedicate several hours to your task. Often, smoked foods require foil wrapping for at least a portion of the cook to retain moisture. Plan to check in at regular intervals to restock wood chips, flip or rotate meat and apply a fresh coat of seasoning or spices.

Find more tips and recipes perfect for a smoking summer at omahasteaks.com.

Ancho chile rubbed smoked beef brisket

Prep time: 1 hour

Cook time: 11-13 hours

Rest time: 1-2 hours

Total time: 13-16 hours

1 whole Omaha Steaks brisket for smoking

2 cups white vinegar

2/3 cup yellow mustard

3/4 cup Omaha Steaks ancho chile rub

4 cups ancho chile smoking spritzer, divided (recipe below)

8 cups apple or cherry wood chips, soaked in water

Remove brisket from bag and rinse with white vinegar then rinse with water.