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Stuart Scott is remembered for his trailblazing style

Jason Lewis

Jason Lewis | 1/7/2015, 11:25 a.m.
Stuart Scott, a longtime anchor for ESPN’s SportsCenter, lost his battle with cancer dying on Sunday morning at the age ...
Stuart Scott

Stuart Scott, a longtime anchor for ESPN’s SportsCenter, lost his battle with cancer dying on Sunday morning at the age of 49.

Scott will be remembered for his signature catch phrases, such as “Boo-Yah,” “As cool as the other side of the pillow,” and “He must be the bus driver cuz he was takin’ him to school.” He brought a level of coolness to the industry that had never been seen before adding a flavor, which endeared him to the sporting world.

In an industry where there are not nearly as many Black faces as White, Scott was a trailblazer who inspired many people in sports media, regardless of their race. His style was unique, and he did not deter from it, even though he received discouraging phone messages and mail from people who thought that he was too Black for television. His style was his calling card, and it made him one of the iconic sports casters of this generation.

Scott’s passing has touched many people, from athletes to colleagues, to sports fans, to the President of the United States.

“I will miss Stuart Scott,” President Barack Obama said in a statement. “Twenty years ago, Stu helped usher in a new way to talk about our favorite teams and the day’s best plays. For much of those twenty years, public service and campaigns have kept me from my family—but wherever I went, I could flip on the TV and Stu and his colleagues on SportsCenter were there. Over the years, he entertained us, and in the end, he inspired us—with courage and love. Michelle and I offer our thoughts and prayers to his family, friends, and colleagues.”

Moments of silence were held at sporting events around the country, including the NFL playoff games on Sunday, and at several NBA and college basketball games.

Scott’s last memorable appearance was at the ESPY Awards this past July, when he accepted the Jimmy V Award for Perseverance. He delivered an emotional acceptance speech that will be replayed for years to come.

“When you die, it does not mean that you lose to cancer. You beat cancer by how you live, why you live, and in the manner in which you live,” Scott said during his speech.

Scott was born in Chicago and was raised in North Carolina. He graduated from the University of North Carolina, where he played wide receiver and defensive back on the club football team. While in college he was initiated into Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.