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At West Coast Expo, one spotlights on health

Brittney M. Walker | 7/13/2011, 5 p.m.

LOS ANGELES, Calif.--Most people understand that the quality of their life is only as good as their health. That's why at the West Coast Expo next month, attendees will have the opportunity to learn how they can better their lives, not only in business and technology, but also in health.

Dr. Vincent Anthony, a kidney and hypertension specialist and Kidney Care Institute (KCI), will offer free kidney screenings as well as blood sugar checks, and other free tests. Established in 2005, KCI has been treating and educating patients and showing individuals ways to prevent the spread of kidney disease.

From detecting it early on to treating those who are in need of a transplant, Anthony understands the importance of keeping a healthy kidney for the overall health.

"We are here to educate people and treat patients," he said. "One of the focuses we have is lower cost of healthcare, not only for the patient by providing quality, but also for the payer sources (insurance companies). "One in 9 people have kidney disease. A large part of the population does not understand the effects on the whole body, because it's not talked about. We are going into the community, because it's an epidemic that is extremely quiet."

"Those with kidney disease are two times as likely to die from [a disease] than those who don't [have it]," he continued.

He further explained that kidney disease can cause or exacerbate a health problem if not diagnosed or treated properly.

The physician's passion is for educating the masses and helping community members make better decisions for their health.

This fall, Anthony will launch a health show called "Lifeline with Dr. Anthony" on Hosanna Broadcasting Network. On the show, he'll discuss overall health and wellness, including ways to prevent disease, live a healthy lifestyle and even answer those tough questions.

There will also be several special segments on men's health, discussing prostate cancer, and other personal issues men tend to shy away from at the doctor's office.

According to the doctor's executive assistant and executive producer of the show, Karen Dick, special topics include children's nutrition, women's health, exercise and active lifestyles, current healthcare policies and legislation, and of course kidney health.

Anthony and his crew of doctors and nurses will be on site to answer questions, recommend treatment and provide information about sleep disorders, which may lead to hypertension and other diseases.

Kidney wellness isn't the only topic for discussion. Cancer, the second leading cause of death in America, is an issue that can't go unexplored at the Expo.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) will be delivering free information and brochures to curious passersby; volunteers will also be readily available to answer any questions people have.

People often miss out on the information and resources the Cancer Society offers patients and their families, explained Karen Martel, director of corporate communications.

The nonprofit organization not only informs patients of the things they may endure while in treatment, but it also provides various support programs.

"We have a program called 'Look Good, Feel Better.' If patients are diagnosed with cancer and they are going through treatment and they are losing their hair, it can be tough especially for women who often go through vanity issues," Martel said. "Licensed cosmetologists provide seminars in hospitals and patients come and get wigs and makeup that are donated by high-end cosmetic companies."

Also, prostate cancer patients are welcome to join supportive groups with other men to discuss challenges and get questions answered that might otherwise be embarrassing to ask. Other counseling services are also available.

Martel also emphasized that the organization can help with free transportation services for patients who are unable to get to and from treatment. More information is available at cancer.org or call 1-800-227-2345.

Other exhibitors and sponsors include Great Beginnings for Black Babies and The Children Collective Agency.