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Congressional Black Caucus says newly elected Black Republicans will be welcomed

ZENITHA PRINCE | 11/17/2010, 5 p.m.

Election Day victories for two Black Republicans raise a rare question in the U.S. House of Representatives in the 112th Congress: How will two African-American members of the Grand Old Party interact with the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC)?

Fourteen Black Republicans ran for Congress in the Nov. 2 mid-term elections but, after all the votes were counted, only Tim Scott, a South Carolina businessman, and Allen West, a Florida-based Army veteran of the Iraq War, will take seats. They are the first African-American Republicans to be elected to Congress since 1995.

In an e-mailed statement CBC Chairwoman Barbara Lee, D-Calif., said unequivocally, "Should either of the two African American Republicans recently elected to the House of Representatives request membership in the Congressional Black Caucus they will be welcomed."

So far, West has said he wants to be part of the CBC, while Scott is still undecided and is leaning toward not participating.

"It's really heartening to see this type of diversity demonstrated in African-American representation," NAACP Washington Bureau Chief Hilary Shelton said. "[Republican Party Chairman] Michael Steele deserves credit for seeing more African Americans seeking office under the Republican banner."

He added, "They could be a real asset to the strategy of passing legislation in the House and in advancing the CBC [Congressional Black Caucus] agenda ... It's very difficult to get things through without the cooperation of Democrats and Republicans."

Not everyone is as sure about the Republican freshmen's value to the CBC, which was created in 1969 as a Capitol Hill advocate for the nation's African Americans. While membership is open to all African-American lawmakers, its members have been overwhelmingly Democrats, with only Republicans Melvin Evans, of the Virgin Islands, and Gary Franks, of Connecticut, ever becoming CBC members. Although invited, J.C. Watts, a Black Republican who represented Oklahoma from 1995 to 2003, declined membership. Sen. Edward Brooke, a Massachusetts Republican who served in the Senate from 1967 through 1979, was not publicly invited and refused to join a CBC boycott of President Richard Nixon's State of the Union address in 1971, although he criticized the Nixon administration's approach to the Black community and civil rights.

"The name of the group is not the Congressional Black Democratic Caucus, it's the Black Caucus. [And] if they go back to their founding principles then these two men should be welcomed with open arms," said Black Republican political strategist Raynard Jackson. But, he predicted, even though West and Scott have been invited, "this group will make a hostile environment for another Black [Republican] based on them not being compatible in their philosophical leaning."

Echoing statements by Chairwoman Lee in an Oct. 22 article in The Economist, Maryland Congresswoman Donna Edwards said, "If they're aligned with the interests of working people, particularly African-Americans, who struggle and they want to work with us to advance those interests," they would be a good addition to the caucus. But, she added, "what I know of them and their agendas, it is difficult for me to see how that would work [though] it might make for some interesting discussions."